EU Resettlement Policy

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Title Source Country
Building a Resettlement Network of European Cities and Regions- Experiences of the SHARE Network 2012-2015 ICMC Europe
Proposal for a Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council Establishing a Union Resettlement Framework and Amending Regulation (EU) No 516/2014 of the European Parliament and the Council: UNHCR’s Observations and Recommendations UNHCR
Resettlement and Humanitarian Admission Programmes in Europe: What Works? - Study European Migration Network (EMN)
Proposal for a Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council Establishing a Union Resettlement Framework and Amending Regulation (EU) No 516/2014 of the European Parliament and the Council European Commission
Conclusions of the Representatives of the Governments of the Member States Meeting within the Council on Resettling through Multilateral and National Schemes 20,000 Persons in Clear Need of International Protection Council of the European Union
Proposal for a Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council Establishing a Union Resettlement Framework and Amending Regulation (EU) No 516/2014 of the European Parliament and the Council: Joint Comments Paper by NGOs Caritas Europa, Churches’ Commission for Migrants in Europe (CCME), European Council for Refugees and Exiles (ECRE), International Catholic Migration Commission (ICMC Europe), International Rescue Committee (IRC), Red Cross EU Office
The Proposed EU Resettlement Framework: Position Paper Amnesty International
EU Resettlement Fact Sheet UNHCR Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic
Welcome to Europe! A comprehensive guide to resettlement ICMC Europe Belgium, Czech Republic
KNOW RESET Final Report: Refugee Resettlement in the EU 2011-2013 Report Delphine Perrin Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic
The story of a refugee EuroParl TV - European Parliament Belgium
Know Reset website ECRE, European University Institute, Migration Policy Centre Belgium, Denmark, Finland
What is the European response to the Syrian refugee crisis? Czech Radio - Daniela Vrbová Czech Republic
Carlow Rohingya Resettlement Programme Aoife Titley Ireland
10,000 refugees from Iraq: A report on joint resettlement in the European Union International Catholic Migration Commission Europe & International Rescue Committee (IRC)
L'Observatoire de France terre d'asile N'59 France terre d'asile France
Resettlement Fact Sheet UNHCR Austria, Belgium
Refugee resettlement: the view from Kenya. Findings from field research in Nairobi and Kakuma refugee camp. Hannah Elliot, KNOW RESET Research Report 2012/01
Refugee Resettlement from Pakistan: Findings from Afghan Refugee Camps in the North-West Frontier Province (NWFP) Ilyas Chattha, KNOW RESET Research Report 2013/01
Europe, now it is your turn to act Amnesty International
Annual Report on the Situation of Asylum in the European Union 2012 European Asylum Support Office
Leaving Libya - A Review of UNHCR’s Emergency Operation in Tunisia and Egypt 2011-2012 UNHCR, Policy Development and Evaluation Service
FA.RE. Feasibility Study for an Italian Resettlement Programme Italian Ministry of Interior Affairs, Italian Council for Refugees (CIR) Italy
Comparative study on the best practices for the integration of resettled refugees in EU member states Study by the Directorate-General for internal policies, Policy department - European Parliament

Building a Resettlement Network of European Cities and Regions- Experiences of the SHARE Network 2012-2015

“Either we enable migrants to become part of the community, or we will witness tensions and a further growth of xenophobic movements. SHARE brought together cities, towns, communities, churches and migrant associations to promote and coordinate a real response to the needs of integration.  I am proud of it.”

Peter Sutherland, UN Special Representative for Migration and President of the International Catholic Migration Commission (ICMC)

ICMC published its report “Building a Resettlement Network of European Cities and Regions- Experiences of the SHARE Network 2012-2015”, being the culmination of 4 years of the SHARE Network learning.

Since 2012, the SHARE project has built a European resettlement network of regions, cities and their civil society partners with the objectives of 1) promoting refugee protection and resettlement and a culture of welcome and 2) improving planning and coordination for refugee reception and integration in Europe.

SHARE has expanded the EU Resettlement Network (ERN), engaging over 1,200 regional and local contacts already active in resettlement, contemplating resettlement projects or planning advocacy for resettlement in their respective countries. The project spanned Europe, engaging stakeholders in Austria, Belgium, Croatia, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Estonia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Ireland, Luxembourg, Latvia, The Netherlands, Norway, Malta, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Romania and the United Kingdom. SHARE has sought to develop a network of actors to share best practices in resettlement between experienced actors and actors in emerging resettlement countries or countries considering resettlement, facilitate refugee integration locally, exchange information and learning in a formalized fashion, advocate for resettlement and share creative and contextualized local resettlement solutions.

With continued loss of life in attempts to cross the Mediterranean, developing adequate channels for the orderly admission of refugees to Europe must be at the core of strategies to address asylum and migration challenges in the European Union. Resettlement is a significant tool in this respect and the SHARE project sought to promote resettlement and improve resettlement outcomes.

Resettlement allows for ahead planning and coordination leading to better reception and integration of refugees. SHARE learning suggests that all countries can develop successful resettlement programmes when properly planned and coordinated among stakeholders and that a European-wide response, involving all countries and regions and municipalities (from large cities to small villages), is essential. 

The SHARE  network position is that the same kind of planning and integration services as are applied in resettlement should be applied in cases of  relocation or any other mechanism to distribute refugees across countries or territories.

A number of key policy recommendations emerged from the SHARE project that have the potential to improve and strengthen resettlement, relocation and refugee reception and integration in Europe which include 1) Non-discrimination among refugees of the same country in granting of status and service provision; 2)  Recognizing the need to strengthen reception and integration services in those regions and municipalities receiving larger number or specific (vulnerable) profiles of refugee; 3) The need for increased attention to refugee placement decisions in a manner sensitive to refugees’ special needs and potential, particularly with respect to integration into the labor market; 4) Strengthening multi-stakeholder cooperation between regions, municipalities and civil society in providing reception, welcome and integration services; 5) Including regional and local actors in financial decision-making (AMIF) and programming; 6) Promoting grassroots initiatives and volunteerism in providing welcome and integration services; 7) Prioritizing the use of Personalized Integration Programs (PIPs) and including employment as an important benchmark in such integration plans.

We hope that this summary of policy reflections, tools and resources and recommendations produced by the SHARE network will support and offer guidance to regional and local actors implementing reception programmes in Europe and be a useful policy tool for a broad range of actors working in the field of asylum and migration in Europe.

Resettlement and Humanitarian Admission Programmes in Europe: What Works? - Study

This study offers a comprehensive overview of the policies and practices of resettlement, humanitarian admission programmes, and private sponsorship initiatives in EU Member States and Norway, identifying challenges and success factors, and providing insights to assist policymakers in further elaborating such programmes, at both national and EU levels. 

Conclusions of the Representatives of the Governments of the Member States Meeting within the Council on Resettling through Multilateral and National Schemes 20,000 Persons in Clear Need of International Protection

This document presents the outcome of the meeting of the Council of the European Union held on 20 July 2015, through which Member States representatives established the resettlement, through multilateral and national schemes, of 22,504 persons in clear need of international protection.

10,000 refugees from Iraq: A report on joint resettlement in the European Union

 

Violence has forced millions of Iraqi children, women and men to flee their homes and seek refuge both inside and beyond their country’s borders. In light of the challenges preventing refugees from returning to Iraq and of the obstacles to local integration in host countries like Jordan and Syria, for many of the most vulnerable refugees, resettlement in a new country is the only durable solution. With this report, the International Catholic Migration Commission (ICMC) and the International Rescue Committee (IRC) want to find out how far EU Member States have come to meet the pledge of resettling up to 10 000 refugees from Iraq, as expressed in the joint EU call of November 2008, and to document what can be considered as a first experience of joint  resettlement in the European Union.

After the Iraqi refugee crisis erupted in 2006, a coordinated EU response was slow to build up and initially relied on the generosity of eight countries with established resettlement programmes. These countries offered some 3 300 places for Iraqi refugees between 2007 and 2008. Under the leadership of Member States like France, Germany, the Netherlands and Sweden, and with the support of the European Commission, the EU response was energised by the November 2008 Council Conclusions and by the decision of a number of countries to establish ad hoc resettlement quotas. As a result, in 2009 alone, twelve EU countries were able to offer over 5 100 resettlement places, thereby bringing the number of resettled refugees from Iraq since 2007 to just over 8 400, and showing that EU countries are able to make a difference by acting together. At the same time, although the joint effort for Iraqi refugees clearly contributed to an increase in resettlement places available for refugees in the EU, with the global increase in resettlement between 2007 and 2009, the relative contribution of the EU has remained unchanged.

The report also describes how resettlement of Iraqis has been carried out in each of the countries involved and makes recommendations to guide further steps by both the EU, as it develops its first Joint EU Resettlement Programme, and the Member States. The November 2008 pledge to resettle up to 10 000 refugees from Iraq has not yet been met and it is not clear how and when this will happen. The question is how much more are the EU and its Member States prepared to do to address the continuing needs of Iraqi and other refugees in need of durable solutions.

KNOW RESET Final Report: Refugee Resettlement in the EU 2011-2013 Report

KNOW RESET aimed at conducting a systematic inventory of resettlement frameworks and practices in the EU, providing a comparative analysis and assessment of resettlement in the Member States, evaluating their resettlement capacity while addressing policy recommendations to the EU and its Member States in order to enhance cooperation and improve resettlement activities. To better understand Member States’ decision-making and better explore the potential for developing resettlement capacity in the EU, the Project has covered the 27 EU Member States whatever the nature and degree of their involvement in refugee resettlement. Unique field research has also been conducted in three major countries of first asylum (Kenya, Pakistan, Tunisia) by external experts hired for the Project, who dedicated their observation and analysis on EU Member States resettlement practices in the pre-departure phase.

The Final Report compiles various deliverables of the KNOW RESET Project: a series of tables and graphs for quantitative and qualitative country comparison, 27 "Resettlement Country Profiles", 3 Country of First Asylum Reports and 2 EU Comparative Reports. The final report is available here