EU Resettlement Policy

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What is the European response to the Syrian refugee crisis?

Czech Radio's Daniela Vrbová produced a broadcast from the SHARE Network Conference for the 'Focus on Foreigners' programme.  Entitled 'What is the European response to the Syrian refugee crisis?' the 25-minute programme uses interviews with SHARE Network Conference participants and others to explore the European response to the Syrian refugee crisis, including via resettlement and Humanitarian Admission Programmes.

Among the individuals interviewed during the broadcast are Hugh Fenton (Director of the Office of the Danish Refugee Council in Jordan); Abdulkareem Abdulkareem, an Iraqi engineer resettled to Germany from Syria in 2009; Vincent Cochetel (Director, UNHCR Bureau for Europe); Karl Kopp (PRO ASYL); Hilde Scheidt (Deputy Mayor of the city of Aachen, Germany), Gabriela Strååt (County Administrative Board of Västerbotten, Sweden) and Lubomir Metnar (Deputy Interior Minister for Internal Security in Czech Republic).

You can listen to the English version of the programme and read a summary of its contents here (please note that the official broadcast lanuage is Czech, and the English audio version is an unofficial translation).

Resettlement Fact Sheet

This fact sheet provides an overview of global resettlement trends in 2012, including submissions by category (cases).

EU Resettlement Fact Sheet

This fact sheet provides an overview of resettlement to the European Union, including statistics on the number of UNHCR-assisted refugees resettled to the European Union in 2012, and their pledges for 2013.

Welcome to Europe! A comprehensive guide to resettlement

 

This publication is an outcome of the joint IOM, UNHCR and ICMC project ‘Linking In EU resettlement – Linking the resettlement phases and connecting (local) resettlement practitioners’, co-funded by the European Commission via the European Refugee Fund.

This new edition of Welcome to Europe covers all aspects of global resettlement needs, processes, policy and partnerships, focusing on the ongoing growth and development of resettlement in Europe, as follows:

Chapter 1 – Resettlement and international protection

Chapter 2 – Global resettlement

Chapter 3 – Refugee situations in focus

Chapter 4 – The resettlement process: from identification to departure

Chapter 5 – Resettlement in Europe – rising slowly but surely

Chapter 7 – European resettlement programmes

Chapter 8 – Building a new life in the community: approaches to reception and integration in Europe

‘Welcome to Europe!’ underscores the life-saving role of resettlement, and contributes to the promotion of resettlement in Europe as one component of a comprehensive and durable approach to protecting refugees. To submit your contributions and reflections on the publication, please contact Sophie Ngo-Diep at communications.europe@icmc.net or start a discussion in the Community of Practice.

Refugee Resettlement from Pakistan: Findings from Afghan Refugee Camps in the North-West Frontier Province (NWFP)

This report surveys Afghan refugee resettlement from Pakistan for the Know Reset Project in order to better understand the processes and practices of the refugee populations’ resettlement in EU member states. This involved interviews with various agencies working with refugees as well as with individual refugees. The collected source material explains how the Afghan refugee community, living in different localities in Pakistan, are informed about resettlement policies, and how refugees are identified and selected and what Afghan refugee groups, if any, are given priorities in the resettlement processes. The report also examines the role played by local, national and international agencies, such as UNHCR, Pakistan-based NGOs, including SACH (Struggle for Change), Sharp (Society for Human Rights and Prisoners Aid), the Human Rights Commission of Pakistan (HRCP) and the International Organization of Migration (IOM). More specifically we examined these organizations as they identified, registered and selected refugees for resettlement. The report also considers how information about resettlement is disseminated to Afghan refugees in “refugee villages”, camps or places; how the refugees are subsequently identified and chosen for resettlement; and how they are assisted in submitting applications and obtaining security clearance from the Pakistan Interior and Foreign Affairs departments. We then asked how submissions are then forwarded to the individual EU countries for resettlement and what selection and scrutiny measures, if any, are adopted by the resettlement countries. Finally, the report looks at the responses and reactions of the Pakistani government in the resettlement of Afghan refugees in Europe and beyond. The findings not only add to the empirical knowledge of resettlement in Pakistan, but offer data to improve the efficiency of resettlement schemes in individual EU member states.

Refugee resettlement: the view from Kenya. Findings from field research in Nairobi and Kakuma refugee camp.

This report presents the findings of field research in Kenya under the KNOW RESET project. It is the outcome of field research in Nairobi and Kakuma refugee camp which sought to map Kenya’s refugee resettlement landscape, with a particular focus on resettlement to European countries. The report presents Kenya’s resettlement landscape, the role of European countries within this landscape and how European resettlement policies and practices are experienced on the ground from the perspectives of UNHCR and its implementing partners. In addition, the report explores refugees’ experiences and narratives around resettlement. The report makes recommendations to UNHCR and European countries around how European resettlement policies could be improved to ease the burden on Kenya as country of first asylum, to increase the efficiency of European resettlement processes in Kenya and to render the resettlement process a smoother and less anxiety-producing experience for refugees.

Annual Report on the Situation of Asylum in the European Union 2012

The 2012 Annual Report on the Situation of Asylum in the European Union aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the requests for international protection made in the EU and how Member States dealt with them, important asylum-related developments at EU and national level, and the functioning of all key aspects of the Common European Asylum System (CEAS).

In the third chapter the Resettlement process in Europe is addressed, with useful charts comparing figures among the European countries in the past five years. The active role of local Municipalities throughout Europe is also highlighted, with reference to the ‘Linking-In EU Resettlement’ project and the European Resettlement Network launched by UNHCR, IOM and ICMC.

The story of a refugee

Filmon Ande is in 2007 uit Eritrea gevlucht. Hij onsnapte met zijn familie aan de dood in de Sahara en woont nu met behulp van de EU in België. Het EP wil meer vluchtelingen zoals Filmon helpen.

Filmon Ande fled Eritrea in 2007. He escaped death in the Sahara desert with his family and lives know in Belgium with the help of the EU. the European Parliament wants to help and support more refugees such as Filmon.

Leaving Libya - A Review of UNHCR’s Emergency Operation in Tunisia and Egypt 2011-2012

UNHCR’s 2011 emergency operation in North Africa, which followed the outbreak of civil war in Libya, addressed one of the largest mixed migration crises that the organization has ever encountered. The unanticipated emergency generated a massive influx of migrants, refugees and asylum seekers in Tunisia and Egypt, two countries which themselves had only recently experienced major political upheavals. As a result of these considerations, little contingency planning had taken place.

In the first few weeks of the emergency, the majority of the new arrivals were third-country nationals, that is, citizens of neither Libya nor the countries to which they moved. Altogether, more than 120 nationalities were represented in the exodus, not to mention hundreds of thousands of Libyans who enjoyed de facto temporary protection on Egyptian and Tunisian soil, as well as access to public services.

To read more, click here.

FA.RE. Feasibility Study for an Italian Resettlement Programme

“FA.RE. – Feasibility Study for an Italian Resettlement Programme” is a project cofinanced by the European Commission and the Ministry of Interior. CIR is the operational implementing partner of the Ministry of Interior. The study’s objective was to verify the feasibility of an Italian Resettlement Programme.
More precisely, FA.RE. has had the following objectives:
a) gaining an in-depth knowledge of the actual functioning of Resettlement programmes;
b) verifying whether other countries’ experiences may be transferred to Italy;
c) providing Italian institutions information and means to decide on the implementation
of an Italian resettlement programme and the participation in a future European
resettlement programme.
This project has been innovative and, in some ways, “revolutionary”. It is the first time, in fact, that Resettlement is treated in Italy as a long-term programme. It appeared necessary for Italy to give a clear political message to show its interest and commitment towards a future-oriented asylum policy, on one hand, and not excluding any necessary mean to facilitate the situation of people asking for protection, on the other.

(Article in Italian, English and Spanish language)