Health assessments

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Preparing for Syrian Resettlement webinar

The number of Syrian refugee admissions will be steadily increasing in the coming year. This webinar, lead by Liyam Eloul, will help your agency become better prepared to serve the particular needs of this population. Topics covered include:
- Background and demographics of Syrian refugees;
- Syrian refugee expectations;
- Potential challenges for Syrian resettlement in the U.S.;
- How to prepare your staff and communities for Syrian resettlement; and
- Who might be helpful partners.

Liyam Eloul is a trauma therapist with a specialization in complex emergencies and urban refugees in the MENA region. Liyam received her postgraduate diploma from the American University in Cairo on Psychosocial Interventions for Refugees and Forced Migrants, and her Master's Degree in International Disaster Psychology from the University of Denver. She has worked with refugees both prior to and following resettlement in the United States. Liyam has worked largely internationally with INGOs over the past decade, including in Egypt, Syria, Oman, Ghana, and Jordan, and has published on the impact of culture on the experience of psychosocial distress, as well as program development. In Syria she worked with UNHCR Damascus, piloting a psychosocial program for the organization as the monitoring and evaluation focal point. Liyam is currently a psychotherapist trainer and clinical supervisor with the Center for Victims of Torture in Amman, Jordan.

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Lebanon: Letter from a Refugee

To mark International Youth Day, 2014, IOM has produced a short film, titled ‘Letter from a Refugee’. The film features moving, honest interviews with a group of young ladies who have fled Syria; they describe the extreme fears, mental health issues and ongoing hope they experienced as young people in a war zone.

 

Responding to Trauma - Handbook based on experiences of Afghan refugee women living in Finland

As more traumatized refugees are coming to settle in Finland, it would be beneficial for social and health workers to understand basic trauma theories, symptoms and reactions and support methods. It is for this purpose that the following thesis booklet was written, regarding responding to trauma, based on experiences from Afghan women. While there are few books written on this topic, it is helpful to have a compact handbook, with precise information, for students and workers to refer to, regarding this subject. Research for this thesis booklet included both qualitative and quantitative methods, with more emphasis on qualitative. There was a considerable amount of research on trauma, Afghanistan, refugees, crisis counseling and mental health. Theories were explored regarding effects of trauma and studies were examined in correlation with post traumatic stress disorder clients. Six interviews were conducted with refugees from Afghanistan now living in Finland and five interviews with Finnish professionals working with traumatized refugees from different countries. From the research and interviews, it is the author’s conclusion that there is a real problem with the amount of trauma many refugees have experienced and the need for healing so that a full and satisfying life in Finland can be realized. Not all refugees will need professional therapy but it is helpful for social and health workers to understand the symptoms and be able to guide the refugee to appropriate channels of support. In conclusion, from the materials gained in this research, there are plans to form and teach a short seminar on trauma for students and professionals in Finland. Also, there is a possibility of setting up a partnership program for students and refugees, initially in Tampere, and then perhaps to other Universities in Finland.

Welcome to Europe! A comprehensive guide to resettlement

 

This publication is an outcome of the joint IOM, UNHCR and ICMC project ‘Linking In EU resettlement – Linking the resettlement phases and connecting (local) resettlement practitioners’, co-funded by the European Commission via the European Refugee Fund.

This new edition of Welcome to Europe covers all aspects of global resettlement needs, processes, policy and partnerships, focusing on the ongoing growth and development of resettlement in Europe, as follows:

Chapter 1 – Resettlement and international protection

Chapter 2 – Global resettlement

Chapter 3 – Refugee situations in focus

Chapter 4 – The resettlement process: from identification to departure

Chapter 5 – Resettlement in Europe – rising slowly but surely

Chapter 7 – European resettlement programmes

Chapter 8 – Building a new life in the community: approaches to reception and integration in Europe

‘Welcome to Europe!’ underscores the life-saving role of resettlement, and contributes to the promotion of resettlement in Europe as one component of a comprehensive and durable approach to protecting refugees. To submit your contributions and reflections on the publication, please contact Sophie Ngo-Diep at communications.europe@icmc.net or start a discussion in the Community of Practice.

Nutrition Surveillance Report

This report presents child growth and malnutrition status of refugee children examined by the IOM Health Assessment Programme at seven key locations around the world namely Ethiopia, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Malaysia, Nepal and Thailand. The report analyses prevalence of two key indicators for protein–energy malnutrition namely weight-for-height or wasting and height-for-age or stunting. Data for this analysis is generated from the IOM data management software called Migrant Management Operational System Application (MiMOSA) using routinely collected information on age, gender, height (or length) and weight for refugee children aged 6–59 months. The public health importance or severity of malnutrition among refugee children in each country is assessed using internationally standardized criteria recommended by WHO.  The IOM Health Assessment Programme plans for regular production and dissemination of this publication for better refugee health monitoring and to inform design of essential nutrition interventions for vulnerable refugee children.

Health assessments in the framework of EU resettlement

Health is an important factor in the resettlement of refugees. Traditional immigration countries have long recognized a need for the crossborder control of diseases and for the protection of the public health of both host communities and refugees.

The legislation and protocols of major immigration countries have evolved over the past decades, from the concept of quarantine upon arrival to the current system of overseas health assessments. With EU countries increasingly participating in refugee resettlement, it is important to consider related health issues, in order to minimize adverse consequences for refugees and hosting communities.