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6954 Kilometres to Home

Mukamusoni and her family fled the Congo Civil War in 1996 when she was just 10 years old, and lived in the Kiziba refugee camp in Rwanda.  Single mother Mukamusoni and her three children were accepted for resettlement by Finland as quota refugees and waited 3 years to make the journey to Finland.  Directed by Juan Reina, the Tampere Film Festival prize-winning film 6954 Kilometres to Home depicts Makamusoni's family's journey from the Kiziba refugee camp in Rwanda to Finland in 2012.  6954 Kilometres to Home shows resettlement preparations, the journey, arrival and settlement from the family’s perspective.

Welcome to Europe! A comprehensive guide to resettlement

 

This publication is an outcome of the joint IOM, UNHCR and ICMC project ‘Linking In EU resettlement – Linking the resettlement phases and connecting (local) resettlement practitioners’, co-funded by the European Commission via the European Refugee Fund.

This new edition of Welcome to Europe covers all aspects of global resettlement needs, processes, policy and partnerships, focusing on the ongoing growth and development of resettlement in Europe, as follows:

Chapter 1 – Resettlement and international protection

Chapter 2 – Global resettlement

Chapter 3 – Refugee situations in focus

Chapter 4 – The resettlement process: from identification to departure

Chapter 5 – Resettlement in Europe – rising slowly but surely

Chapter 7 – European resettlement programmes

Chapter 8 – Building a new life in the community: approaches to reception and integration in Europe

‘Welcome to Europe!’ underscores the life-saving role of resettlement, and contributes to the promotion of resettlement in Europe as one component of a comprehensive and durable approach to protecting refugees. To submit your contributions and reflections on the publication, please contact Sophie Ngo-Diep at communications.europe@icmc.net or start a discussion in the Community of Practice.

Canadian Orientation Abroad: Helping Future Immigrants Adapt to Life in Canada

IOM’s Canadian Orientation Abroad (COA), funded by the Canadian Government’s Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC), is one of our more successful and long-serving migrant training programmes to date.  COA provides orientation sessions for visa-ready migrants bound for Canada –  including refugees, immigrants, and live-in caregivers.  The pre-departure orientation for Canada-bound migrants is designed  to help them adapt to life in their new country.   In FY 2012 a total of  11,261 migrants attended a COA session, and total trained since inception of the program in 1998  exceeds 160,000.

FA.RE. Feasibility Study for an Italian Resettlement Programme

“FA.RE. – Feasibility Study for an Italian Resettlement Programme” is a project cofinanced by the European Commission and the Ministry of Interior. CIR is the operational implementing partner of the Ministry of Interior. The study’s objective was to verify the feasibility of an Italian Resettlement Programme.
More precisely, FA.RE. has had the following objectives:
a) gaining an in-depth knowledge of the actual functioning of Resettlement programmes;
b) verifying whether other countries’ experiences may be transferred to Italy;
c) providing Italian institutions information and means to decide on the implementation
of an Italian resettlement programme and the participation in a future European
resettlement programme.
This project has been innovative and, in some ways, “revolutionary”. It is the first time, in fact, that Resettlement is treated in Italy as a long-term programme. It appeared necessary for Italy to give a clear political message to show its interest and commitment towards a future-oriented asylum policy, on one hand, and not excluding any necessary mean to facilitate the situation of people asking for protection, on the other.

(Article in Italian, English and Spanish language)

Landa project - pre-arrival information and reception of resettled refugees - video

Sweden is the European country receiving the highest number of resettled refugees annually, with an annual resettlement quota of 1,900 persons.  Resettled refugees who come to Sweden often have little knowledge of their new home, which puts great demands on the municipalities receiving the them.

Through Project Landa, the County Administrative Board of Gävleborg had the opportunity to develop pre-arrival information and reception for resettled refugees.  Running for two years and financed by the European Refugee Fund, the project ensured that those involved in receiving resettled refugees in Swedish municipalities were involved in all phases of the resettlement process for refugees resettled to Sweden.  The following film will explain more about the Landa Project and how reception and integration of resettled refugees in Gävleborg is organised.