Reception of resettled refugees

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Title Source Country
Building a Resettlement Network of European Cities and Regions- Experiences of the SHARE Network 2012-2015 ICMC Europe
Innovative San Diego Refugee Resettlement Program that Serves Broader Community Earns Award for Exceptional Immigrant Integration Initiatives Migration Policy Institute (MPI)
Welcome to Europe! A comprehensive guide to resettlement ICMC Europe Belgium, Czech Republic
KNOW RESET Final Report: Refugee Resettlement in the EU 2011-2013 Report Delphine Perrin Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic
Emergency Transit Centre, Romania Romania
Refugee Resettlement in France Factsheet Forum Réfugiés-Cosi France
Belonging: The Resettlement Experiences of Hmong Refugees in Texas and Germany Faith Nibbs Germany
'Gun ons de tijd...' Werkboek psychosociale begeleiding bij hervestigde vluchtelingen / 'Grant us time...'. Manual psychosocial support to resettled refugees Evert Bloemen, Erick Vloeberghs Netherlands
Le récit d'un réfugié érythréen réinstallé en Belgique European Parliament - EuroparlTV Belgium
Centres for Economic Development, Transport and the Environment (ELY-Centres) ELY-keskus Finland
Shaping our future Elina Ekholm, Sophie Magennis & Leni Salmelin Finland, Ireland
6954 Kilometres to Home Directed by Juan Reina Finland
Refugees from the Democratic Republic of the Congo Cultural Orientation Resource Center
Refugee Backgrounder No. 2: The 1972 Burundians Cultural Orientation Resource Center
Adult Refugee Programme - Yearbook 2010/2011 County Dublin Vocational Education Committee (VEC) Ireland
Landa project - pre-arrival information and reception of resettled refugees - video County Administrative Board Gävleborg Sweden
Reception and integration of resettled refugees in Gävleborg - Landa project brochure County Administrative Board Gävleborg Sweden
Ricominciare da capo - Speciale CIR/OIM Contributions of Franco Frattini, Giulia Falzoi, Flavio Di Giacomo, Novita Amadei, Rossella Celmi, Linda Sette, Luca C. Zingoni Italy
Situation des réfugiés palestiniens et irakiens dans la région Commissariat Général aux réfugiés et aux apatrides (CGRA) - BELGIUM Belgium
Comment se déroule la sélection des réfugiés dans le cadre de la réinstallation? Commissariat Général aux réfugiés et aux apatrides (CGRA) - BELGIUM Belgium
Carlow Rohingya Resettlement Programme Aoife Titley Ireland
Increasing Congolese Refugee Arrivals: Insights for Preparation Andrew Fuys, Associate Director for International Programs, CWS & Sandra Vines, Associate Director for Resettlement & Integration, CWS
The Lost Boys of Sudan - part 2 60 Minutes
The Lost Boys of Sudan - part 1 60 Minutes
Preparing for Syrian Resettlement webinar Ethiopian Community Development Council

Building a Resettlement Network of European Cities and Regions- Experiences of the SHARE Network 2012-2015

“Either we enable migrants to become part of the community, or we will witness tensions and a further growth of xenophobic movements. SHARE brought together cities, towns, communities, churches and migrant associations to promote and coordinate a real response to the needs of integration.  I am proud of it.”

Peter Sutherland, UN Special Representative for Migration and President of the International Catholic Migration Commission (ICMC)

ICMC published its report “Building a Resettlement Network of European Cities and Regions- Experiences of the SHARE Network 2012-2015”, being the culmination of 4 years of the SHARE Network learning.

Since 2012, the SHARE project has built a European resettlement network of regions, cities and their civil society partners with the objectives of 1) promoting refugee protection and resettlement and a culture of welcome and 2) improving planning and coordination for refugee reception and integration in Europe.

SHARE has expanded the EU Resettlement Network (ERN), engaging over 1,200 regional and local contacts already active in resettlement, contemplating resettlement projects or planning advocacy for resettlement in their respective countries. The project spanned Europe, engaging stakeholders in Austria, Belgium, Croatia, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Estonia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Ireland, Luxembourg, Latvia, The Netherlands, Norway, Malta, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Romania and the United Kingdom. SHARE has sought to develop a network of actors to share best practices in resettlement between experienced actors and actors in emerging resettlement countries or countries considering resettlement, facilitate refugee integration locally, exchange information and learning in a formalized fashion, advocate for resettlement and share creative and contextualized local resettlement solutions.

With continued loss of life in attempts to cross the Mediterranean, developing adequate channels for the orderly admission of refugees to Europe must be at the core of strategies to address asylum and migration challenges in the European Union. Resettlement is a significant tool in this respect and the SHARE project sought to promote resettlement and improve resettlement outcomes.

Resettlement allows for ahead planning and coordination leading to better reception and integration of refugees. SHARE learning suggests that all countries can develop successful resettlement programmes when properly planned and coordinated among stakeholders and that a European-wide response, involving all countries and regions and municipalities (from large cities to small villages), is essential. 

The SHARE  network position is that the same kind of planning and integration services as are applied in resettlement should be applied in cases of  relocation or any other mechanism to distribute refugees across countries or territories.

A number of key policy recommendations emerged from the SHARE project that have the potential to improve and strengthen resettlement, relocation and refugee reception and integration in Europe which include 1) Non-discrimination among refugees of the same country in granting of status and service provision; 2)  Recognizing the need to strengthen reception and integration services in those regions and municipalities receiving larger number or specific (vulnerable) profiles of refugee; 3) The need for increased attention to refugee placement decisions in a manner sensitive to refugees’ special needs and potential, particularly with respect to integration into the labor market; 4) Strengthening multi-stakeholder cooperation between regions, municipalities and civil society in providing reception, welcome and integration services; 5) Including regional and local actors in financial decision-making (AMIF) and programming; 6) Promoting grassroots initiatives and volunteerism in providing welcome and integration services; 7) Prioritizing the use of Personalized Integration Programs (PIPs) and including employment as an important benchmark in such integration plans.

We hope that this summary of policy reflections, tools and resources and recommendations produced by the SHARE network will support and offer guidance to regional and local actors implementing reception programmes in Europe and be a useful policy tool for a broad range of actors working in the field of asylum and migration in Europe.

Preparing for Syrian Resettlement webinar

The number of Syrian refugee admissions will be steadily increasing in the coming year. This webinar, lead by Liyam Eloul, will help your agency become better prepared to serve the particular needs of this population. Topics covered include:
- Background and demographics of Syrian refugees;
- Syrian refugee expectations;
- Potential challenges for Syrian resettlement in the U.S.;
- How to prepare your staff and communities for Syrian resettlement; and
- Who might be helpful partners.

Liyam Eloul is a trauma therapist with a specialization in complex emergencies and urban refugees in the MENA region. Liyam received her postgraduate diploma from the American University in Cairo on Psychosocial Interventions for Refugees and Forced Migrants, and her Master's Degree in International Disaster Psychology from the University of Denver. She has worked with refugees both prior to and following resettlement in the United States. Liyam has worked largely internationally with INGOs over the past decade, including in Egypt, Syria, Oman, Ghana, and Jordan, and has published on the impact of culture on the experience of psychosocial distress, as well as program development. In Syria she worked with UNHCR Damascus, piloting a psychosocial program for the organization as the monitoring and evaluation focal point. Liyam is currently a psychotherapist trainer and clinical supervisor with the Center for Victims of Torture in Amman, Jordan.

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Moving to Mars - a million miles from Burma

Moving to Mars follows two refugee families from Burma over the course of a year that will change their lives completely. Forced from their homeland by the repressive military junta, they have lived in a Thai refugee camp for many years. A resettlement scheme offers them the chance of a new life, but their new home, in the British city of Sheffield, will be different to everything they have ever known.

With intimate access, this feature-length documentary from Mat Whitecross (The Road to Guantanamo) depicts the families' moving and sometimes humorous struggles with 21st century Britain. Their stories give us a unique insight into the experiences of displaced people throughout the UK, whilst showing the human consequences of Burma's political unrest.

10,000 refugees from Iraq: A report on joint resettlement in the European Union

 

Violence has forced millions of Iraqi children, women and men to flee their homes and seek refuge both inside and beyond their country’s borders. In light of the challenges preventing refugees from returning to Iraq and of the obstacles to local integration in host countries like Jordan and Syria, for many of the most vulnerable refugees, resettlement in a new country is the only durable solution. With this report, the International Catholic Migration Commission (ICMC) and the International Rescue Committee (IRC) want to find out how far EU Member States have come to meet the pledge of resettling up to 10 000 refugees from Iraq, as expressed in the joint EU call of November 2008, and to document what can be considered as a first experience of joint  resettlement in the European Union.

After the Iraqi refugee crisis erupted in 2006, a coordinated EU response was slow to build up and initially relied on the generosity of eight countries with established resettlement programmes. These countries offered some 3 300 places for Iraqi refugees between 2007 and 2008. Under the leadership of Member States like France, Germany, the Netherlands and Sweden, and with the support of the European Commission, the EU response was energised by the November 2008 Council Conclusions and by the decision of a number of countries to establish ad hoc resettlement quotas. As a result, in 2009 alone, twelve EU countries were able to offer over 5 100 resettlement places, thereby bringing the number of resettled refugees from Iraq since 2007 to just over 8 400, and showing that EU countries are able to make a difference by acting together. At the same time, although the joint effort for Iraqi refugees clearly contributed to an increase in resettlement places available for refugees in the EU, with the global increase in resettlement between 2007 and 2009, the relative contribution of the EU has remained unchanged.

The report also describes how resettlement of Iraqis has been carried out in each of the countries involved and makes recommendations to guide further steps by both the EU, as it develops its first Joint EU Resettlement Programme, and the Member States. The November 2008 pledge to resettle up to 10 000 refugees from Iraq has not yet been met and it is not clear how and when this will happen. The question is how much more are the EU and its Member States prepared to do to address the continuing needs of Iraqi and other refugees in need of durable solutions.

Increasing Congolese Refugee Arrivals: Insights for Preparation

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 
With the number of Congolese arrivals to the USRAP expected to increase, RCUSA members seek to  work with ORR, PRM and other stakeholders to ensure sufficient resources for the integration of  Congolese arrivals. This paper presents an analysis of data from both overseas and domestic service  providers, including survey responses by 43 local resettlement agencies (RAs) that have recently  resettled Congolese refugees.