Reception of resettled refugees /Placement policies

Primary tabs

FA.RE. Feasibility Study for an Italian Resettlement Programme

“FA.RE. – Feasibility Study for an Italian Resettlement Programme” is a project cofinanced by the European Commission and the Ministry of Interior. CIR is the operational implementing partner of the Ministry of Interior. The study’s objective was to verify the feasibility of an Italian Resettlement Programme.
More precisely, FA.RE. has had the following objectives:
a) gaining an in-depth knowledge of the actual functioning of Resettlement programmes;
b) verifying whether other countries’ experiences may be transferred to Italy;
c) providing Italian institutions information and means to decide on the implementation
of an Italian resettlement programme and the participation in a future European
resettlement programme.
This project has been innovative and, in some ways, “revolutionary”. It is the first time, in fact, that Resettlement is treated in Italy as a long-term programme. It appeared necessary for Italy to give a clear political message to show its interest and commitment towards a future-oriented asylum policy, on one hand, and not excluding any necessary mean to facilitate the situation of people asking for protection, on the other.

(Article in Italian, English and Spanish language)

Comparative study on the best practices for the integration of resettled refugees in EU member states

This study examines the question of the integration of resettled refugees in   Europe,  by  analysing  the  policy  framework  for  resettlement  and refugee   integration   and   the   practices   at   the   national   and the European level. The study is illustrated with examples from various Member States.
Drawing from existing guidelines and global recommendations on integration and resettlement, the study underlines good practices and challenges and puts forward proposals to improve national resettlement programmes and to promote a better resettlement policy in Europe.

Policies and practices in the health-related reception of quota refugees in Denmark, Danish Medical Journal 59/1

 

INTRODUCTION: Quota refugees coming to Denmark are mandated refugee status offshore and approximately 500 quota refugees are resettled annually. Upon arrival to Denmark, quota refugees are received directly in the municipalities and municipal caseworkers therefore have the practical responsibility for their health-related reception. The aim of this study was to investigate the health-related reception of quota refugees in Denmark by focusing on the presence of municipal policies and practices, and to test for possible associations with these policies and practices.

MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study was based on a survey of all Danish municipalities that had received quota refugees after 1 January 2007. A questionnaire was designed on the background of preliminary research. A total 49 of the 58 includable respondents returned the questionnaire, which yielded a response rate of 84%.

RESULTS: We found that 49% of the municipalities had no policies for health-related reception of quota refugees and 69% had no specific policies regarding general practitioners’general health assessment of quota refugees upon their arrival. Disparities between the municipalities were also found regarding their health-related practices. The presence of health-related policies and certain health-related practices were found to be associated with the number of quota refugees received and the size of municipality.

CONCLUSION: Due to the lack of policies and the large responsibility of case workers who are not health professionals, there is a risk that the health needs of this particularly vulnerable group may not be met satisfactorily.

Rain is beautiful

Omar, a Somali refugee, fled the war in Libya last year to live in a camp on the country's border with Tunisia. This episode of his story, Rain is Beautiful, begins with emotional farewells at the camp as Omar leaves his friends behind to begin a new life in Sandviken in northern Sweden. He is met at Stockholm airport by the Swedish migration board, visits a doctor, gets his 'right to remain' signed and learns what margarine is.

For the original video, visit Amnesty International's webpage.

Reception and integration of resettled refugees in Gävleborg - Landa project brochure

Resettled refugees who come to Sweden often have little knowledge of their new home, which puts great demands on the municipal reception.

Through Project Landa, we were given an opportunity to develop this reception. The County Administrative Board of Gävleborg has been working in this countywide project for nearly two years. The project has been financed with funds from the European Refugee Fund. The purpose of the project was to develop the reception and informational efforts for the newly arrived resettled refugees that were to settle in the county.

 

Landa project - pre-arrival information and reception of resettled refugees - video

Sweden is the European country receiving the highest number of resettled refugees annually, with an annual resettlement quota of 1,900 persons.  Resettled refugees who come to Sweden often have little knowledge of their new home, which puts great demands on the municipalities receiving the them.

Through Project Landa, the County Administrative Board of Gävleborg had the opportunity to develop pre-arrival information and reception for resettled refugees.  Running for two years and financed by the European Refugee Fund, the project ensured that those involved in receiving resettled refugees in Swedish municipalities were involved in all phases of the resettlement process for refugees resettled to Sweden.  The following film will explain more about the Landa Project and how reception and integration of resettled refugees in Gävleborg is organised.