Stakeholder Cooperation for more and better resettlement

Primary tabs

Title Source Country
Building a Resettlement Network of European Cities and Regions- Experiences of the SHARE Network 2012-2015 ICMC Europe
Report of 2017 Annual Tripartite Consultations on Resettlement Refugee Council of Australia
Welcome to Europe! A comprehensive guide to resettlement ICMC Europe Belgium, Czech Republic
What is the European response to the Syrian refugee crisis? Czech Radio - Daniela Vrbová Czech Republic
Carlow Rohingya Resettlement Programme Aoife Titley Ireland
10,000 refugees from Iraq: A report on joint resettlement in the European Union International Catholic Migration Commission Europe & International Rescue Committee (IRC)
L'Observatoire de France terre d'asile N'59 France terre d'asile France
Resettlement at Risk: Meeting Emerging Challenges to Refugee Resettlement in Local Communities Melanie Nezer
Refugee resettlement: the view from Kenya. Findings from field research in Nairobi and Kakuma refugee camp. Hannah Elliot, KNOW RESET Research Report 2012/01
Refugee Resettlement from Pakistan: Findings from Afghan Refugee Camps in the North-West Frontier Province (NWFP) Ilyas Chattha, KNOW RESET Research Report 2013/01
Europe, now it is your turn to act Amnesty International
Leaving Libya - A Review of UNHCR’s Emergency Operation in Tunisia and Egypt 2011-2012 UNHCR, Policy Development and Evaluation Service
FA.RE. Feasibility Study for an Italian Resettlement Programme Italian Ministry of Interior Affairs, Italian Council for Refugees (CIR) Italy
Comparative study on the best practices for the integration of resettled refugees in EU member states Study by the Directorate-General for internal policies, Policy department - European Parliament
Policies and practices in the health-related reception of quota refugees in Denmark, Danish Medical Journal 59/1 Hanne W. Frederiksen, Allan Krasnik & Marie Nørredam Denmark

Building a Resettlement Network of European Cities and Regions- Experiences of the SHARE Network 2012-2015

“Either we enable migrants to become part of the community, or we will witness tensions and a further growth of xenophobic movements. SHARE brought together cities, towns, communities, churches and migrant associations to promote and coordinate a real response to the needs of integration.  I am proud of it.”

Peter Sutherland, UN Special Representative for Migration and President of the International Catholic Migration Commission (ICMC)

ICMC published its report “Building a Resettlement Network of European Cities and Regions- Experiences of the SHARE Network 2012-2015”, being the culmination of 4 years of the SHARE Network learning.

Since 2012, the SHARE project has built a European resettlement network of regions, cities and their civil society partners with the objectives of 1) promoting refugee protection and resettlement and a culture of welcome and 2) improving planning and coordination for refugee reception and integration in Europe.

SHARE has expanded the EU Resettlement Network (ERN), engaging over 1,200 regional and local contacts already active in resettlement, contemplating resettlement projects or planning advocacy for resettlement in their respective countries. The project spanned Europe, engaging stakeholders in Austria, Belgium, Croatia, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Estonia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Ireland, Luxembourg, Latvia, The Netherlands, Norway, Malta, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Romania and the United Kingdom. SHARE has sought to develop a network of actors to share best practices in resettlement between experienced actors and actors in emerging resettlement countries or countries considering resettlement, facilitate refugee integration locally, exchange information and learning in a formalized fashion, advocate for resettlement and share creative and contextualized local resettlement solutions.

With continued loss of life in attempts to cross the Mediterranean, developing adequate channels for the orderly admission of refugees to Europe must be at the core of strategies to address asylum and migration challenges in the European Union. Resettlement is a significant tool in this respect and the SHARE project sought to promote resettlement and improve resettlement outcomes.

Resettlement allows for ahead planning and coordination leading to better reception and integration of refugees. SHARE learning suggests that all countries can develop successful resettlement programmes when properly planned and coordinated among stakeholders and that a European-wide response, involving all countries and regions and municipalities (from large cities to small villages), is essential. 

The SHARE  network position is that the same kind of planning and integration services as are applied in resettlement should be applied in cases of  relocation or any other mechanism to distribute refugees across countries or territories.

A number of key policy recommendations emerged from the SHARE project that have the potential to improve and strengthen resettlement, relocation and refugee reception and integration in Europe which include 1) Non-discrimination among refugees of the same country in granting of status and service provision; 2)  Recognizing the need to strengthen reception and integration services in those regions and municipalities receiving larger number or specific (vulnerable) profiles of refugee; 3) The need for increased attention to refugee placement decisions in a manner sensitive to refugees’ special needs and potential, particularly with respect to integration into the labor market; 4) Strengthening multi-stakeholder cooperation between regions, municipalities and civil society in providing reception, welcome and integration services; 5) Including regional and local actors in financial decision-making (AMIF) and programming; 6) Promoting grassroots initiatives and volunteerism in providing welcome and integration services; 7) Prioritizing the use of Personalized Integration Programs (PIPs) and including employment as an important benchmark in such integration plans.

We hope that this summary of policy reflections, tools and resources and recommendations produced by the SHARE network will support and offer guidance to regional and local actors implementing reception programmes in Europe and be a useful policy tool for a broad range of actors working in the field of asylum and migration in Europe.

Report of 2017 Annual Tripartite Consultations on Resettlement

Organised by UNHCR, the Government of New Zealand and NZ Red Cross, the 2017 ATCR took place on 12-14 June and brought together representatives of 32 nations involved in resettlement. The 2017 ATCR explored ways of increasing and broadening resettlement as a durable solution for refugees, in line with commitments outlined in the New York Declaration for Refugees and Migrants. Delegates discussed strategies to involve new states in resettlement, build community-based sponsorship, increase the engagement of the private sector, introduce complementary pathways to traditional resettlement programs, and broaden resettlement criteria. 

10,000 refugees from Iraq: A report on joint resettlement in the European Union

 

Violence has forced millions of Iraqi children, women and men to flee their homes and seek refuge both inside and beyond their country’s borders. In light of the challenges preventing refugees from returning to Iraq and of the obstacles to local integration in host countries like Jordan and Syria, for many of the most vulnerable refugees, resettlement in a new country is the only durable solution. With this report, the International Catholic Migration Commission (ICMC) and the International Rescue Committee (IRC) want to find out how far EU Member States have come to meet the pledge of resettling up to 10 000 refugees from Iraq, as expressed in the joint EU call of November 2008, and to document what can be considered as a first experience of joint  resettlement in the European Union.

After the Iraqi refugee crisis erupted in 2006, a coordinated EU response was slow to build up and initially relied on the generosity of eight countries with established resettlement programmes. These countries offered some 3 300 places for Iraqi refugees between 2007 and 2008. Under the leadership of Member States like France, Germany, the Netherlands and Sweden, and with the support of the European Commission, the EU response was energised by the November 2008 Council Conclusions and by the decision of a number of countries to establish ad hoc resettlement quotas. As a result, in 2009 alone, twelve EU countries were able to offer over 5 100 resettlement places, thereby bringing the number of resettled refugees from Iraq since 2007 to just over 8 400, and showing that EU countries are able to make a difference by acting together. At the same time, although the joint effort for Iraqi refugees clearly contributed to an increase in resettlement places available for refugees in the EU, with the global increase in resettlement between 2007 and 2009, the relative contribution of the EU has remained unchanged.

The report also describes how resettlement of Iraqis has been carried out in each of the countries involved and makes recommendations to guide further steps by both the EU, as it develops its first Joint EU Resettlement Programme, and the Member States. The November 2008 pledge to resettle up to 10 000 refugees from Iraq has not yet been met and it is not clear how and when this will happen. The question is how much more are the EU and its Member States prepared to do to address the continuing needs of Iraqi and other refugees in need of durable solutions.

What is the European response to the Syrian refugee crisis?

Czech Radio's Daniela Vrbová produced a broadcast from the SHARE Network Conference for the 'Focus on Foreigners' programme.  Entitled 'What is the European response to the Syrian refugee crisis?' the 25-minute programme uses interviews with SHARE Network Conference participants and others to explore the European response to the Syrian refugee crisis, including via resettlement and Humanitarian Admission Programmes.

Among the individuals interviewed during the broadcast are Hugh Fenton (Director of the Office of the Danish Refugee Council in Jordan); Abdulkareem Abdulkareem, an Iraqi engineer resettled to Germany from Syria in 2009; Vincent Cochetel (Director, UNHCR Bureau for Europe); Karl Kopp (PRO ASYL); Hilde Scheidt (Deputy Mayor of the city of Aachen, Germany), Gabriela Strååt (County Administrative Board of Västerbotten, Sweden) and Lubomir Metnar (Deputy Interior Minister for Internal Security in Czech Republic).

You can listen to the English version of the programme and read a summary of its contents here (please note that the official broadcast lanuage is Czech, and the English audio version is an unofficial translation).

Resettlement at Risk: Meeting Emerging Challenges to Refugee Resettlement in Local Communities

This paper will provide an overview of the U.S. Refugee Admissions Program and some of the new ways refugee resettlement has affected communities. It will also explore the recent rise in anti-refugee sentiment and
activity in three states. The paper includes recommendations for mitigating antirefugee sentiment, fighting anti-resettlement efforts when they emerge, and strengthening the U.S. Refugee Admissions Program. The goal of these recommendations is to ensure that the U.S. continues to lead the world in providing a safe haven to refugees, to integrate newcomers successfully, and to create and maintain thriving, diverse communities that are a model for the rest of the world.

Welcome to Europe! A comprehensive guide to resettlement

 

This publication is an outcome of the joint IOM, UNHCR and ICMC project ‘Linking In EU resettlement – Linking the resettlement phases and connecting (local) resettlement practitioners’, co-funded by the European Commission via the European Refugee Fund.

This new edition of Welcome to Europe covers all aspects of global resettlement needs, processes, policy and partnerships, focusing on the ongoing growth and development of resettlement in Europe, as follows:

Chapter 1 – Resettlement and international protection

Chapter 2 – Global resettlement

Chapter 3 – Refugee situations in focus

Chapter 4 – The resettlement process: from identification to departure

Chapter 5 – Resettlement in Europe – rising slowly but surely

Chapter 7 – European resettlement programmes

Chapter 8 – Building a new life in the community: approaches to reception and integration in Europe

‘Welcome to Europe!’ underscores the life-saving role of resettlement, and contributes to the promotion of resettlement in Europe as one component of a comprehensive and durable approach to protecting refugees. To submit your contributions and reflections on the publication, please contact Sophie Ngo-Diep at communications.europe@icmc.net or start a discussion in the Community of Practice.

Refugee Resettlement from Pakistan: Findings from Afghan Refugee Camps in the North-West Frontier Province (NWFP)

This report surveys Afghan refugee resettlement from Pakistan for the Know Reset Project in order to better understand the processes and practices of the refugee populations’ resettlement in EU member states. This involved interviews with various agencies working with refugees as well as with individual refugees. The collected source material explains how the Afghan refugee community, living in different localities in Pakistan, are informed about resettlement policies, and how refugees are identified and selected and what Afghan refugee groups, if any, are given priorities in the resettlement processes. The report also examines the role played by local, national and international agencies, such as UNHCR, Pakistan-based NGOs, including SACH (Struggle for Change), Sharp (Society for Human Rights and Prisoners Aid), the Human Rights Commission of Pakistan (HRCP) and the International Organization of Migration (IOM). More specifically we examined these organizations as they identified, registered and selected refugees for resettlement. The report also considers how information about resettlement is disseminated to Afghan refugees in “refugee villages”, camps or places; how the refugees are subsequently identified and chosen for resettlement; and how they are assisted in submitting applications and obtaining security clearance from the Pakistan Interior and Foreign Affairs departments. We then asked how submissions are then forwarded to the individual EU countries for resettlement and what selection and scrutiny measures, if any, are adopted by the resettlement countries. Finally, the report looks at the responses and reactions of the Pakistani government in the resettlement of Afghan refugees in Europe and beyond. The findings not only add to the empirical knowledge of resettlement in Pakistan, but offer data to improve the efficiency of resettlement schemes in individual EU member states.

Refugee resettlement: the view from Kenya. Findings from field research in Nairobi and Kakuma refugee camp.

This report presents the findings of field research in Kenya under the KNOW RESET project. It is the outcome of field research in Nairobi and Kakuma refugee camp which sought to map Kenya’s refugee resettlement landscape, with a particular focus on resettlement to European countries. The report presents Kenya’s resettlement landscape, the role of European countries within this landscape and how European resettlement policies and practices are experienced on the ground from the perspectives of UNHCR and its implementing partners. In addition, the report explores refugees’ experiences and narratives around resettlement. The report makes recommendations to UNHCR and European countries around how European resettlement policies could be improved to ease the burden on Kenya as country of first asylum, to increase the efficiency of European resettlement processes in Kenya and to render the resettlement process a smoother and less anxiety-producing experience for refugees.

Leaving Libya - A Review of UNHCR’s Emergency Operation in Tunisia and Egypt 2011-2012

UNHCR’s 2011 emergency operation in North Africa, which followed the outbreak of civil war in Libya, addressed one of the largest mixed migration crises that the organization has ever encountered. The unanticipated emergency generated a massive influx of migrants, refugees and asylum seekers in Tunisia and Egypt, two countries which themselves had only recently experienced major political upheavals. As a result of these considerations, little contingency planning had taken place.

In the first few weeks of the emergency, the majority of the new arrivals were third-country nationals, that is, citizens of neither Libya nor the countries to which they moved. Altogether, more than 120 nationalities were represented in the exodus, not to mention hundreds of thousands of Libyans who enjoyed de facto temporary protection on Egyptian and Tunisian soil, as well as access to public services.

To read more, click here.