UNHCR Framework for Resettlement

Primary tabs

Title Source Country
Welcome to Europe! A comprehensive guide to resettlement ICMC Europe Belgium, Czech Republic
Carlow Rohingya Resettlement Programme Aoife Titley Ireland
'We are the victims of the separation': A Report on Bhutanese Refugees Remaining in Nepal Susan Banki & Nicole Phillips
10,000 refugees from Iraq: A report on joint resettlement in the European Union International Catholic Migration Commission Europe & International Rescue Committee (IRC)
L'Observatoire de France terre d'asile N'59 France terre d'asile France
Pathway to Protection: UNHCR services Immi TV, Department of Immigration and Border Protection, Australian government
Postmillenial UNHCR refugee resettlement: New developments and old challenges Haruno Nakashiba
Europe, now it is your turn to act Amnesty International
The Emergency Transit Centre in Romania UNHCR, the Government of Romania and the International Organization for Migration Romania
Leaving Libya - A Review of UNHCR’s Emergency Operation in Tunisia and Egypt 2011-2012 UNHCR, Policy Development and Evaluation Service
Emergency Transit Centre in Timisoara: Hope for a new start UNHCR Central Europe Romania
The Swedish Refugee Quota 2012 - Pool slots and continued focus on the Horn of Africa Migrationsverket - Swedish Migration Board Sweden
Refugee resettlement: 2012 and beyond Margaret Piper AM, Paul Power, Dr Graham Thom
FA.RE. Feasibility Study for an Italian Resettlement Programme Italian Ministry of Interior Affairs, Italian Council for Refugees (CIR) Italy
Mixed migration in Horn of Africa and Yemen Regional Mixed Migration Secretariat (RMMS) - UNHCR
UNHCR Resettlement Handbook UNHCR
EU Resettlement News Digest - 17 August 2012 Linking-In EU Resettlement

'We are the victims of the separation': A Report on Bhutanese Refugees Remaining in Nepal

'In the early 1990s tens of thousands of Lhotshampas, ethnic Nepalese from the southern region of Bhutan, fled their homeland through India and sought refuge in Nepal. More than 100,000 refugees lived in camps in eastern Nepal in a protracted situation for 18 years until 2008, when several countries of the Global North announced that they would begin a program of mass resettlement and take the Bhutanese refugees out of Nepal. It has now been more than five years since the process of mass resettlement was initiated. There are 88,841 Bhutanese refugees who have already resettled to third countries and 28,735 remaining in the camps. Of the remaining population, 7,206 refugees have not indicated any interest in resettlement. 1 This report focuses on the voices of the people who do not wish to resettle, and thus includes refugee perspectives that may be critical of resettlement. The analysis undertaken in this report, however, is in no way meant to diminish the option of resettlement as a valuable, indeed a critical, solution. The report merely aims to shed light on the opinions of those refugees who do not plan to resettle so that their voices will not be forgotten or relegated to ‘old news.’

10,000 refugees from Iraq: A report on joint resettlement in the European Union

 

Violence has forced millions of Iraqi children, women and men to flee their homes and seek refuge both inside and beyond their country’s borders. In light of the challenges preventing refugees from returning to Iraq and of the obstacles to local integration in host countries like Jordan and Syria, for many of the most vulnerable refugees, resettlement in a new country is the only durable solution. With this report, the International Catholic Migration Commission (ICMC) and the International Rescue Committee (IRC) want to find out how far EU Member States have come to meet the pledge of resettling up to 10 000 refugees from Iraq, as expressed in the joint EU call of November 2008, and to document what can be considered as a first experience of joint  resettlement in the European Union.

After the Iraqi refugee crisis erupted in 2006, a coordinated EU response was slow to build up and initially relied on the generosity of eight countries with established resettlement programmes. These countries offered some 3 300 places for Iraqi refugees between 2007 and 2008. Under the leadership of Member States like France, Germany, the Netherlands and Sweden, and with the support of the European Commission, the EU response was energised by the November 2008 Council Conclusions and by the decision of a number of countries to establish ad hoc resettlement quotas. As a result, in 2009 alone, twelve EU countries were able to offer over 5 100 resettlement places, thereby bringing the number of resettled refugees from Iraq since 2007 to just over 8 400, and showing that EU countries are able to make a difference by acting together. At the same time, although the joint effort for Iraqi refugees clearly contributed to an increase in resettlement places available for refugees in the EU, with the global increase in resettlement between 2007 and 2009, the relative contribution of the EU has remained unchanged.

The report also describes how resettlement of Iraqis has been carried out in each of the countries involved and makes recommendations to guide further steps by both the EU, as it develops its first Joint EU Resettlement Programme, and the Member States. The November 2008 pledge to resettle up to 10 000 refugees from Iraq has not yet been met and it is not clear how and when this will happen. The question is how much more are the EU and its Member States prepared to do to address the continuing needs of Iraqi and other refugees in need of durable solutions.

Pathway to Protection: UNHCR services

In this video, Michael Wells from the UNHCR Sub-office in Damak, Nepal outlines the refugee resettlement process which enables refugees to make the right decisions for their future.
We learn how the UNHCR has referred over 90 000 people to resettlement countries and, of those, around 62 000 have departed the Beldangi Refugee Camp in Damak to start their new life.

In this video, Michael Wells from the UNHCR Sub-office in Damak, Nepal outlines the refugee resettlement process which enables refugees to make the right decisions for their future.
We learn how the UNHCR has referred over 90 000 people to resettlement countries and, of those, around 62 000 have departed the Beldangi Refugee Camp in Damak to start their new life.

Postmillenial UNHCR refugee resettlement: New developments and old challenges

Resettlement under the auspices of the office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) is a tool of protection and a durable solution for refugees. This paper contributes to the study of refugee resettlement by analyzing the policy development and challenges of the UNHCR resettlement after the turn of the millennium (the 2000s). While

UNHCR has developed guidelines, tools and concepts to better manage the resettlement process, resulting in an increase of resettlement submissions, the admission criteria of resettlement countries have not fully adopted the protection based resettlement priorities developed by UNHCR. This disjuncture reveals two contentious issues: the double-screening of refugee claims and immigration-related restrictive or discriminatory selection criteria. Resettlement is highly dependent on the humanitarian and political will of resettlement countries in the vacuum of legal obligations. The resettlement of a refugee to a third country from the country in which he or she first sought asylum is one of the three durable solutions (voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement) that the office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) is mandated to seek, in tandem with its core function of providing international protection. Academic studies on refugee resettlement under the auspices  f UNHCR are largely classified into three disciplinary approaches. One is a historical approach that examines the evolution of UNHCR resettlement in the macro-political landscape. Existing literature covers the development of UNHCR resettlement before and until 1990s.  The second approach is anthropological and reveals the micro-politics most specifically related to the identification of refugees for resettlement.  The third approach is to examine resettlement from a legal viewpoint.

The current paper contributes to the study of UNHCR resettlement by analyzing the development and challenges of the UNHCR resettlement programme after the turn of the millennium (the 2000s) to answer one particular question: in what ways has the development of resettlement impacted international protection and what are the areas that may require further development?

Welcome to Europe! A comprehensive guide to resettlement

 

This publication is an outcome of the joint IOM, UNHCR and ICMC project ‘Linking In EU resettlement – Linking the resettlement phases and connecting (local) resettlement practitioners’, co-funded by the European Commission via the European Refugee Fund.

This new edition of Welcome to Europe covers all aspects of global resettlement needs, processes, policy and partnerships, focusing on the ongoing growth and development of resettlement in Europe, as follows:

Chapter 1 – Resettlement and international protection

Chapter 2 – Global resettlement

Chapter 3 – Refugee situations in focus

Chapter 4 – The resettlement process: from identification to departure

Chapter 5 – Resettlement in Europe – rising slowly but surely

Chapter 7 – European resettlement programmes

Chapter 8 – Building a new life in the community: approaches to reception and integration in Europe

‘Welcome to Europe!’ underscores the life-saving role of resettlement, and contributes to the promotion of resettlement in Europe as one component of a comprehensive and durable approach to protecting refugees. To submit your contributions and reflections on the publication, please contact Sophie Ngo-Diep at communications.europe@icmc.net or start a discussion in the Community of Practice.

Leaving Libya - A Review of UNHCR’s Emergency Operation in Tunisia and Egypt 2011-2012

UNHCR’s 2011 emergency operation in North Africa, which followed the outbreak of civil war in Libya, addressed one of the largest mixed migration crises that the organization has ever encountered. The unanticipated emergency generated a massive influx of migrants, refugees and asylum seekers in Tunisia and Egypt, two countries which themselves had only recently experienced major political upheavals. As a result of these considerations, little contingency planning had taken place.

In the first few weeks of the emergency, the majority of the new arrivals were third-country nationals, that is, citizens of neither Libya nor the countries to which they moved. Altogether, more than 120 nationalities were represented in the exodus, not to mention hundreds of thousands of Libyans who enjoyed de facto temporary protection on Egyptian and Tunisian soil, as well as access to public services.

To read more, click here.

Emergency Transit Centre in Timisoara: Hope for a new start

Emergency Transit Centre in Timisoara offers hope for a new start for refugees who are not safe in their first country of asylum and need a safe place to stay until they can be resettled to another country. There, they receive medical care, social and psychological support, as well as cultural orientation to their host countries.

The Swedish Refugee Quota 2012 - Pool slots and continued focus on the Horn of Africa

Every year, the government sets aside a certain amountof funding for a Swedish refugee quota. The refugee quota is a way for Sweden to support refugees around the world who do not have the possibility to return to their country of origin, nor to be granted protection in the country to which they have fled. The Swedish Migration Board has been assigned by the government to resettle refugees, based on a proposal from UNHCR. In 2012, the Swedish Migration Board plans to resettle 1900 refugees and persons in need of protection, to Sweden.

Refugee resettlement: 2012 and beyond

For many years now, irregular migration and asylum seeking have dominated refugee-related discourse within and between governments. On those relatively rare occasions when discussion about refugees strays beyond this focus, it has almost always been to the issue of integration, especially as developed countries confront the necessity of responding to their increasingly diverse populace. Meanwhile, other areas of refugee-related activity have been largely ignored. It is true that work continues in these areas and lives are influenced but one cannot help but wonder whether the lack of attention might at worst, be having a deleterious impact on the effectiveness of this work or at best, not allowing its potential to be fulfilled.
One such area is resettlement. It is regrettable that this is the case as resettlement is not only about giving vulnerable refugees the chance of a new life, it has a variety of other uses that have a far wider application than simply assisting those resettled.