Advocating for Resettlement

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REMOVING THE STUMBLING BLOCKS: Ways to Use Resettlement More Effectively to Protect Vulnerable Refugee Minors

As documented in this report, most unaccompanied minors have little option but to remain in highly precarious situations in countries of first asylum. Others will go forth in search of sanctuary. Each year since 2010, the number of children arriving unaccompanied in the USA has doubled. It is estimated that 60,000 unaccompanied children will reach the USA in 2014. Though not on the same scale, other western states have also seen a significant increase in asylum applications from unaccompanied minors in recent years. 
 
Understanding why the international protection regime is failing to make effective use of one of the most important tools at its disposal – resettlement – is of critical importance. What are the obstacles? At what stage of the process do they occur? And what can be done to remove them? These and many other related questions provided the motivation for this research project. 

10,000 refugees from Iraq: A report on joint resettlement in the European Union

 

Violence has forced millions of Iraqi children, women and men to flee their homes and seek refuge both inside and beyond their country’s borders. In light of the challenges preventing refugees from returning to Iraq and of the obstacles to local integration in host countries like Jordan and Syria, for many of the most vulnerable refugees, resettlement in a new country is the only durable solution. With this report, the International Catholic Migration Commission (ICMC) and the International Rescue Committee (IRC) want to find out how far EU Member States have come to meet the pledge of resettling up to 10 000 refugees from Iraq, as expressed in the joint EU call of November 2008, and to document what can be considered as a first experience of joint  resettlement in the European Union.

After the Iraqi refugee crisis erupted in 2006, a coordinated EU response was slow to build up and initially relied on the generosity of eight countries with established resettlement programmes. These countries offered some 3 300 places for Iraqi refugees between 2007 and 2008. Under the leadership of Member States like France, Germany, the Netherlands and Sweden, and with the support of the European Commission, the EU response was energised by the November 2008 Council Conclusions and by the decision of a number of countries to establish ad hoc resettlement quotas. As a result, in 2009 alone, twelve EU countries were able to offer over 5 100 resettlement places, thereby bringing the number of resettled refugees from Iraq since 2007 to just over 8 400, and showing that EU countries are able to make a difference by acting together. At the same time, although the joint effort for Iraqi refugees clearly contributed to an increase in resettlement places available for refugees in the EU, with the global increase in resettlement between 2007 and 2009, the relative contribution of the EU has remained unchanged.

The report also describes how resettlement of Iraqis has been carried out in each of the countries involved and makes recommendations to guide further steps by both the EU, as it develops its first Joint EU Resettlement Programme, and the Member States. The November 2008 pledge to resettle up to 10 000 refugees from Iraq has not yet been met and it is not clear how and when this will happen. The question is how much more are the EU and its Member States prepared to do to address the continuing needs of Iraqi and other refugees in need of durable solutions.

What is the European response to the Syrian refugee crisis?

Czech Radio's Daniela Vrbová produced a broadcast from the SHARE Network Conference for the 'Focus on Foreigners' programme.  Entitled 'What is the European response to the Syrian refugee crisis?' the 25-minute programme uses interviews with SHARE Network Conference participants and others to explore the European response to the Syrian refugee crisis, including via resettlement and Humanitarian Admission Programmes.

Among the individuals interviewed during the broadcast are Hugh Fenton (Director of the Office of the Danish Refugee Council in Jordan); Abdulkareem Abdulkareem, an Iraqi engineer resettled to Germany from Syria in 2009; Vincent Cochetel (Director, UNHCR Bureau for Europe); Karl Kopp (PRO ASYL); Hilde Scheidt (Deputy Mayor of the city of Aachen, Germany), Gabriela Strååt (County Administrative Board of Västerbotten, Sweden) and Lubomir Metnar (Deputy Interior Minister for Internal Security in Czech Republic).

You can listen to the English version of the programme and read a summary of its contents here (please note that the official broadcast lanuage is Czech, and the English audio version is an unofficial translation).

Pathway to Protection: Rai Family Resettlement Journey

After more than 15 years Tek and Padam Maya Rai leave Beldangi Refugee camp in Nepal for a new life in Launceston, Australia. They reflect on the their time in the camp and have mixed emotions about leaving family and friends.

Arriving in Launceston they are filled with hope and happiness for their children and family as they journey toward a pathway to protection.

 

Pathway to Protection: Life beyond Beldangi Refugee Camp

Join Tika and Indra who have lived in the Beldangi Refugee Camp, Nepal, for more than 15 years. Share their journeys so far - their daily routines and the hardships of life in the camp.
We hear abut their anxiety, hope and excitement of resettling in Australia as they take the next step towards a pathway to protection.

Resettlement at Risk: Meeting Emerging Challenges to Refugee Resettlement in Local Communities

This paper will provide an overview of the U.S. Refugee Admissions Program and some of the new ways refugee resettlement has affected communities. It will also explore the recent rise in anti-refugee sentiment and
activity in three states. The paper includes recommendations for mitigating antirefugee sentiment, fighting anti-resettlement efforts when they emerge, and strengthening the U.S. Refugee Admissions Program. The goal of these recommendations is to ensure that the U.S. continues to lead the world in providing a safe haven to refugees, to integrate newcomers successfully, and to create and maintain thriving, diverse communities that are a model for the rest of the world.

Resettlement Fact Sheet

This fact sheet provides an overview of global resettlement trends in 2012, including submissions by category (cases).