Community Development

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Living Spirit: Muslim Women and Human Rights Forum: the right to participate in social change - Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission

Over 140 women and girls from a variety of different cultural backgrounds attended this one-day interactive forum52, aiming to:

  • Promote harmony and understanding between Muslims and non-Muslims;
  • Develop strategies to combat religious and racial discrimination and vilification against women;
  • Provide an effective way of making Muslim women’s voices heard and for them to express their concerns, needs and aspirations;
  • Increase understanding of legal protections against discrimination and vilification in Australia.

SPIRIT – Finnish Red Cross

The Spirit project, led by the Finnish Red Cross, encourages municipalities to be more open to receiving refugees by confronting negative attitudes towards foreigners and raising community awareness about refugees. To do this the project has developed civic participation through volunteering activities related to refugee reception and integration; promoted cooperation between local NGOs and authorities and clarified stakeholders’ mandates and responsibilities.

Pre-Arrival Community Preparedness, Operation Swaagatem-Bhutanese Case Study-Immigrant Services Society of British Columbia (ISS of BC)

In 2008, Canada agreed to resettle 5000 Bhutanese refugees over a four-year- period from camps in Nepal, for the first time. The NGO, Immigrant Services Society of British Columbia (ISS of BC), decided to organise a pre-arrival community planning forum. The aim of the planning forum was to inform the community and mainstream services about the arrival of the Bhutanese refugees, to involve them in the process and coordinate a welcome for the newly arriving refugees. In preparation, forum organisers consulted the local Nepalese community

Resettlement at Risk: Meeting Emerging Challenges to Refugee Resettlement in Local Communities

This paper will provide an overview of the U.S. Refugee Admissions Program and some of the new ways refugee resettlement has affected communities. It will also explore the recent rise in anti-refugee sentiment and
activity in three states. The paper includes recommendations for mitigating antirefugee sentiment, fighting anti-resettlement efforts when they emerge, and strengthening the U.S. Refugee Admissions Program. The goal of these recommendations is to ensure that the U.S. continues to lead the world in providing a safe haven to refugees, to integrate newcomers successfully, and to create and maintain thriving, diverse communities that are a model for the rest of the world.

Welcome to Europe! A comprehensive guide to resettlement

 

This publication is an outcome of the joint IOM, UNHCR and ICMC project ‘Linking In EU resettlement – Linking the resettlement phases and connecting (local) resettlement practitioners’, co-funded by the European Commission via the European Refugee Fund.

This new edition of Welcome to Europe covers all aspects of global resettlement needs, processes, policy and partnerships, focusing on the ongoing growth and development of resettlement in Europe, as follows:

Chapter 1 – Resettlement and international protection

Chapter 2 – Global resettlement

Chapter 3 – Refugee situations in focus

Chapter 4 – The resettlement process: from identification to departure

Chapter 5 – Resettlement in Europe – rising slowly but surely

Chapter 7 – European resettlement programmes

Chapter 8 – Building a new life in the community: approaches to reception and integration in Europe

‘Welcome to Europe!’ underscores the life-saving role of resettlement, and contributes to the promotion of resettlement in Europe as one component of a comprehensive and durable approach to protecting refugees. To submit your contributions and reflections on the publication, please contact Sophie Ngo-Diep at communications.europe@icmc.net or start a discussion in the Community of Practice.

The World at Our Doorstep

The Onondaga Citizens League published its first study report in 1979, the same year that the first refugees from Vietnam were resettled in Syracuse. It is somehow fitting then, that as OCL celebrates the 35th anniversary of its founding, we release our latest report, The World at Our Doorstep, which explores – and celebrates – our community’s continuing commitment to welcoming and resettling refugees from all over the world.

This year’s study on refugee resettlement grew out of an awareness that while Syracuse has a long history of welcoming new populations, the increasing numbers of refugees resettled here in recent years have brought concerns about the community’s ability to absorb these new residents and help them adjust. Many recent refugees come from areas of the world where they suffered years of civil strife, warfare and deprivation. They arrive with fewer resources and higher needs than past refugees. The Citizens League study sought to determine what might be done to strengthen the existing human services system that helps refugees thrive and become part of our community.

Awareness Raising in the Community – Burma Center Prague - Czech Republic

In 2008 the Czech Republic engaged in a small programme to resettle around 40 Burmese refugees a year, as part of a three-year pilot project. The Czech Burma Center (BCP), an independent NGO located in Prague, ran a series of educational activities to raise awareness in the community and promote better understanding of newly arrived refugees and their needs. They gave lectures to social workers, government officials and other representatives from NGOs, churches, schools and the general public who had contact with the refugees.

The Gateway Protection Refugees’ Community Forum – “When we are together we are one”

The Gateway Protection Refugees’ Community Forum was set up to bring together the crosssection of resettled refugees living in Sheffield, UK. Liberian, Congolese, Karen, Burmese, Somali and Iraqi refugees all contribute to the Forum to share their experiences, address common issues, find support, and build relationships across cultural divides. The Forum meets every month in facilities offered by a local community association. The forum has over 400 members and a management committee, which reflects the diverse demographic of the resettled refugee community in Sheffield.