General points on refugee resettlement

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Title Source Country
FA.RE. Feasibility Study for an Italian Resettlement Programme Italian Ministry of Interior Affairs, Italian Council for Refugees (CIR) Italy
Comparative study on the best practices for the integration of resettled refugees in EU member states Study by the Directorate-General for internal policies, Policy department - European Parliament
Mixed migration in Horn of Africa and Yemen Regional Mixed Migration Secretariat (RMMS) - UNHCR
Policies and practices in the health-related reception of quota refugees in Denmark, Danish Medical Journal 59/1 Hanne W. Frederiksen, Allan Krasnik & Marie Nørredam Denmark
Resettlement in the Netherlands - interviews with Bhutanese refugees Global Human Rights Defence Netherlands
UNHCR Resettlement Handbook UNHCR
EU Resettlement News Digest - 17 August 2012 Linking-In EU Resettlement

Economic Impact of Refugees in the Cleveland Area

This report details the employment and fiscal impacts of refugees and refugee service organisations in the Cleveland area in the benchmark, 2012. This report also includes case studies and a summary of recent refugee historical trends.

Resettlement at Risk: Meeting Emerging Challenges to Refugee Resettlement in Local Communities

This paper will provide an overview of the U.S. Refugee Admissions Program and some of the new ways refugee resettlement has affected communities. It will also explore the recent rise in anti-refugee sentiment and
activity in three states. The paper includes recommendations for mitigating antirefugee sentiment, fighting anti-resettlement efforts when they emerge, and strengthening the U.S. Refugee Admissions Program. The goal of these recommendations is to ensure that the U.S. continues to lead the world in providing a safe haven to refugees, to integrate newcomers successfully, and to create and maintain thriving, diverse communities that are a model for the rest of the world.

Resettlement Fact Sheet

This fact sheet provides an overview of global resettlement trends in 2012, including submissions by category (cases).

EU Resettlement Fact Sheet

This fact sheet provides an overview of resettlement to the European Union, including statistics on the number of UNHCR-assisted refugees resettled to the European Union in 2012, and their pledges for 2013.

Welcome to Europe! A comprehensive guide to resettlement

 

This publication is an outcome of the joint IOM, UNHCR and ICMC project ‘Linking In EU resettlement – Linking the resettlement phases and connecting (local) resettlement practitioners’, co-funded by the European Commission via the European Refugee Fund.

This new edition of Welcome to Europe covers all aspects of global resettlement needs, processes, policy and partnerships, focusing on the ongoing growth and development of resettlement in Europe, as follows:

Chapter 1 – Resettlement and international protection

Chapter 2 – Global resettlement

Chapter 3 – Refugee situations in focus

Chapter 4 – The resettlement process: from identification to departure

Chapter 5 – Resettlement in Europe – rising slowly but surely

Chapter 7 – European resettlement programmes

Chapter 8 – Building a new life in the community: approaches to reception and integration in Europe

‘Welcome to Europe!’ underscores the life-saving role of resettlement, and contributes to the promotion of resettlement in Europe as one component of a comprehensive and durable approach to protecting refugees. To submit your contributions and reflections on the publication, please contact Sophie Ngo-Diep at communications.europe@icmc.net or start a discussion in the Community of Practice.

Refugee Resettlement from Pakistan: Findings from Afghan Refugee Camps in the North-West Frontier Province (NWFP)

This report surveys Afghan refugee resettlement from Pakistan for the Know Reset Project in order to better understand the processes and practices of the refugee populations’ resettlement in EU member states. This involved interviews with various agencies working with refugees as well as with individual refugees. The collected source material explains how the Afghan refugee community, living in different localities in Pakistan, are informed about resettlement policies, and how refugees are identified and selected and what Afghan refugee groups, if any, are given priorities in the resettlement processes. The report also examines the role played by local, national and international agencies, such as UNHCR, Pakistan-based NGOs, including SACH (Struggle for Change), Sharp (Society for Human Rights and Prisoners Aid), the Human Rights Commission of Pakistan (HRCP) and the International Organization of Migration (IOM). More specifically we examined these organizations as they identified, registered and selected refugees for resettlement. The report also considers how information about resettlement is disseminated to Afghan refugees in “refugee villages”, camps or places; how the refugees are subsequently identified and chosen for resettlement; and how they are assisted in submitting applications and obtaining security clearance from the Pakistan Interior and Foreign Affairs departments. We then asked how submissions are then forwarded to the individual EU countries for resettlement and what selection and scrutiny measures, if any, are adopted by the resettlement countries. Finally, the report looks at the responses and reactions of the Pakistani government in the resettlement of Afghan refugees in Europe and beyond. The findings not only add to the empirical knowledge of resettlement in Pakistan, but offer data to improve the efficiency of resettlement schemes in individual EU member states.

Refugee resettlement: the view from Kenya. Findings from field research in Nairobi and Kakuma refugee camp.

This report presents the findings of field research in Kenya under the KNOW RESET project. It is the outcome of field research in Nairobi and Kakuma refugee camp which sought to map Kenya’s refugee resettlement landscape, with a particular focus on resettlement to European countries. The report presents Kenya’s resettlement landscape, the role of European countries within this landscape and how European resettlement policies and practices are experienced on the ground from the perspectives of UNHCR and its implementing partners. In addition, the report explores refugees’ experiences and narratives around resettlement. The report makes recommendations to UNHCR and European countries around how European resettlement policies could be improved to ease the burden on Kenya as country of first asylum, to increase the efficiency of European resettlement processes in Kenya and to render the resettlement process a smoother and less anxiety-producing experience for refugees.

New Land, New Life - The inspiring stories of five refugees

New Land, New Life, tells the inspiring firsthand stories of five refugees from the Horn of Africa who've settled in Australia and made a new life in a new land for themselves.

New Land, New Life was funded by the Department of Immigration and Citizenship under the Diversity and Social Cohesion Program.

Refugee Backgrounder No. 2: The 1972 Burundians

The United States has agreed to resettle a group of Burundian refugees who have lived in Tanzanian refugee camps since 1972. The refugees, who are not able to return safely to their homes in Burundi or settle permanently in Tanzania, were referred to the United States for resettlement consideration by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR). Known as the “1972 Burundians,” the group resides in three different refugee camps in Tanzania: Ngara in the north, Kibondo in the country’s central region, and Kasulu in the south.

During FY 2007, the United States will resettle 2,000 to 3,000 of the refugees. An additional 4,000 to 5,000 will be resettled during FY 2008 and FY 2009.

Who are the 1972 Burundians? Why are they being resettled in the United States? What are their cultural customs and background characteristics? What will their resettlement needs be?

 

Refugees from the Democratic Republic of the Congo

Over the next 5 years, the United States expects to resettle tens of thousands of refugees from the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), scene of some of the world’s worst violence and human rights abuses in recent years. The refugees are part of a population of more than 3 million Congolese refugees and internally displaced persons forced by war and unrest to flee their homes. The refugees, mostly ethnic minorities from eastern DRC, will be resettled out of neighboring first-asylum countries, where conditions are difficult and often unsafe. In the United States, the refugees will be joining more than 10,000 Congolese who have been resettled since 2001.

This backgrounder provides U.S. resettlement communities with basic information about the new refugee arrivals. It looks at the causes of the refugee crisis, life in the DRC and countries of first asylum, the basic background characteristics of the refugees, and their resettlement experiences in the United States. The backgrounder also notes the strengths incoming Congolese refugees bring and the challenges they may face upon resettlement.