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Welcome to Europe! A comprehensive guide to resettlement

 

This publication is an outcome of the joint IOM, UNHCR and ICMC project ‘Linking In EU resettlement – Linking the resettlement phases and connecting (local) resettlement practitioners’, co-funded by the European Commission via the European Refugee Fund.

This new edition of Welcome to Europe covers all aspects of global resettlement needs, processes, policy and partnerships, focusing on the ongoing growth and development of resettlement in Europe, as follows:

Chapter 1 – Resettlement and international protection

Chapter 2 – Global resettlement

Chapter 3 – Refugee situations in focus

Chapter 4 – The resettlement process: from identification to departure

Chapter 5 – Resettlement in Europe – rising slowly but surely

Chapter 7 – European resettlement programmes

Chapter 8 – Building a new life in the community: approaches to reception and integration in Europe

‘Welcome to Europe!’ underscores the life-saving role of resettlement, and contributes to the promotion of resettlement in Europe as one component of a comprehensive and durable approach to protecting refugees. To submit your contributions and reflections on the publication, please contact Sophie Ngo-Diep at communications.europe@icmc.net or start a discussion in the Community of Practice.

The World at Our Doorstep

The Onondaga Citizens League published its first study report in 1979, the same year that the first refugees from Vietnam were resettled in Syracuse. It is somehow fitting then, that as OCL celebrates the 35th anniversary of its founding, we release our latest report, The World at Our Doorstep, which explores – and celebrates – our community’s continuing commitment to welcoming and resettling refugees from all over the world.

This year’s study on refugee resettlement grew out of an awareness that while Syracuse has a long history of welcoming new populations, the increasing numbers of refugees resettled here in recent years have brought concerns about the community’s ability to absorb these new residents and help them adjust. Many recent refugees come from areas of the world where they suffered years of civil strife, warfare and deprivation. They arrive with fewer resources and higher needs than past refugees. The Citizens League study sought to determine what might be done to strengthen the existing human services system that helps refugees thrive and become part of our community.

Réseau pour l'intégration des réinstallés – Network for the Integration of Resettled Refugees - France Terre d’Asile (FTdA)

In France newly arrived refugees being resettled are normally housed in reception centres with asylum seekers. Under a new programme starting in 2010 called Réseau pour l'intégration des réinstallés , refugees have the opportunity to be referred by the government French Office for Immigrant Integration (OFII) for a housing placement and accompanying integration support programme after three months in the centre.

The Swedish Refugee quota

They are often called “quota refugees” but many prefer the label “UN refugees”. It also happens – consciously or unconsciously – that they are wrongly called “real refugees” in opposition to those who came to Sweden and sought asylum on their own. This is a matter of the approximately 1,900 people taken as part of the annual Swedish refugee quota and who have their residence permit prepared before entry.

FA.RE. Feasibility Study for an Italian Resettlement Programme

“FA.RE. – Feasibility Study for an Italian Resettlement Programme” is a project cofinanced by the European Commission and the Ministry of Interior. CIR is the operational implementing partner of the Ministry of Interior. The study’s objective was to verify the feasibility of an Italian Resettlement Programme.
More precisely, FA.RE. has had the following objectives:
a) gaining an in-depth knowledge of the actual functioning of Resettlement programmes;
b) verifying whether other countries’ experiences may be transferred to Italy;
c) providing Italian institutions information and means to decide on the implementation
of an Italian resettlement programme and the participation in a future European
resettlement programme.
This project has been innovative and, in some ways, “revolutionary”. It is the first time, in fact, that Resettlement is treated in Italy as a long-term programme. It appeared necessary for Italy to give a clear political message to show its interest and commitment towards a future-oriented asylum policy, on one hand, and not excluding any necessary mean to facilitate the situation of people asking for protection, on the other.

(Article in Italian, English and Spanish language)

Carlow Rohingya Resettlement Programme

This research report, on behalf of the County Carlow Development Board, aims to provide a systematic assessment and evaluation of the Carlow Rohingya Resettlement Programme. Data was collected to explore the opinions and inputs of relevant stakeholders in the area in order to provide useful feedback about the effectiveness and value of the project. It aims to qualitatively document the key learning from the programme, to highlight areas of success and achievement and to indicate areas in need of greater attention. In addition, it aims to assess the current level of need of the Rohingya community and to make recommendations for the future development of the Resettlement Programme based on the main findings of the research. It is intended that this document act as the first comprehensive account of all of the initiatives that took place in the first year of the Carlow Rohingya Resettlement Programme as well as contextualising the project within the most recent and relevant social framework.

Rain is beautiful

Omar, a Somali refugee, fled the war in Libya last year to live in a camp on the country's border with Tunisia. This episode of his story, Rain is Beautiful, begins with emotional farewells at the camp as Omar leaves his friends behind to begin a new life in Sandviken in northern Sweden. He is met at Stockholm airport by the Swedish migration board, visits a doctor, gets his 'right to remain' signed and learns what margarine is.

For the original video, visit Amnesty International's webpage.