Identification & Selection of refugees

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Title Source Country
Taking Stock of Refugee Resettlement: Policy Objectives, Practical Tradeoffs, and the Evidence Base - Report Migration Policy Institute (MPI)
The Swedish Refugee quota Migrationsverket - Swedish Migration Board Sweden
The Swedish Refugee Quota 2012 - Pool slots and continued focus on the Horn of Africa Migrationsverket - Swedish Migration Board Sweden
Consolidation of the Act on Integration of Aliens in Denmark n.785, 10/08/2009 Ministry of Refugee, Immigration and Integration Affairs Denmark
A Life on Hold Nick Francis & Mark Silver
RELATÓRIO DE ACTIVIDADES 2011 PORTUGUESE REFUGEE COUNCIL (CPR) Portugal
Resettling to the UK: The Gateway Protection Programme Refugee Council - UK UK
Resettling Refugees: Canada’s Humanitarian Commitments Sandra Elgersma, Economics, Resources and International Affairs Division - The Library of Parliament, Canada
'We are the victims of the separation': A Report on Bhutanese Refugees Remaining in Nepal Susan Banki & Nicole Phillips
Statistical Overview - Migration and Asylum 2011 The Danish Immigration Service Denmark
Country Chapters - BELGIUM- UNHCR Resettlement Handbook The Government of Belgium - UNHCR Belgium
Country Chapters - FRANCE- UNHCR Resettlement Handbook The Government of France - UNHCR France
REMOVING THE STUMBLING BLOCKS: Ways to Use Resettlement More Effectively to Protect Vulnerable Refugee Minors The University of Sydney
What did the UDI do in 2011? - Annual Report UDI - Norvegian Directorate of Immigration Norway
UNHCR Resettlement Handbook UNHCR
The Emergency Transit Centre in Romania UNHCR, the Government of Romania and the International Organization for Migration Romania

Preparing for Syrian Resettlement webinar

The number of Syrian refugee admissions will be steadily increasing in the coming year. This webinar, lead by Liyam Eloul, will help your agency become better prepared to serve the particular needs of this population. Topics covered include:
- Background and demographics of Syrian refugees;
- Syrian refugee expectations;
- Potential challenges for Syrian resettlement in the U.S.;
- How to prepare your staff and communities for Syrian resettlement; and
- Who might be helpful partners.

Liyam Eloul is a trauma therapist with a specialization in complex emergencies and urban refugees in the MENA region. Liyam received her postgraduate diploma from the American University in Cairo on Psychosocial Interventions for Refugees and Forced Migrants, and her Master's Degree in International Disaster Psychology from the University of Denver. She has worked with refugees both prior to and following resettlement in the United States. Liyam has worked largely internationally with INGOs over the past decade, including in Egypt, Syria, Oman, Ghana, and Jordan, and has published on the impact of culture on the experience of psychosocial distress, as well as program development. In Syria she worked with UNHCR Damascus, piloting a psychosocial program for the organization as the monitoring and evaluation focal point. Liyam is currently a psychotherapist trainer and clinical supervisor with the Center for Victims of Torture in Amman, Jordan.

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How to sponsor a refugee

Of the more than 10 million refugees from around the world, the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees or UNHCR estimates that at least 800,000 of them will eventually need to resettle to another country, like Canada.

The Government of Canada has introduced a unique program to help refugees.  The Blended Visa Office-Referred program makes it easier for private sponsors to provide support....to refugees in need.

Follow the steps refugees take when they are sponsored under the Blended Visa Office-Referred Program. Learn how refugees are selected overseas and matched with Canadian sponsors.

Moving to Mars - a million miles from Burma

Moving to Mars follows two refugee families from Burma over the course of a year that will change their lives completely. Forced from their homeland by the repressive military junta, they have lived in a Thai refugee camp for many years. A resettlement scheme offers them the chance of a new life, but their new home, in the British city of Sheffield, will be different to everything they have ever known.

With intimate access, this feature-length documentary from Mat Whitecross (The Road to Guantanamo) depicts the families' moving and sometimes humorous struggles with 21st century Britain. Their stories give us a unique insight into the experiences of displaced people throughout the UK, whilst showing the human consequences of Burma's political unrest.

'We are the victims of the separation': A Report on Bhutanese Refugees Remaining in Nepal

'In the early 1990s tens of thousands of Lhotshampas, ethnic Nepalese from the southern region of Bhutan, fled their homeland through India and sought refuge in Nepal. More than 100,000 refugees lived in camps in eastern Nepal in a protracted situation for 18 years until 2008, when several countries of the Global North announced that they would begin a program of mass resettlement and take the Bhutanese refugees out of Nepal. It has now been more than five years since the process of mass resettlement was initiated. There are 88,841 Bhutanese refugees who have already resettled to third countries and 28,735 remaining in the camps. Of the remaining population, 7,206 refugees have not indicated any interest in resettlement. 1 This report focuses on the voices of the people who do not wish to resettle, and thus includes refugee perspectives that may be critical of resettlement. The analysis undertaken in this report, however, is in no way meant to diminish the option of resettlement as a valuable, indeed a critical, solution. The report merely aims to shed light on the opinions of those refugees who do not plan to resettle so that their voices will not be forgotten or relegated to ‘old news.’

REMOVING THE STUMBLING BLOCKS: Ways to Use Resettlement More Effectively to Protect Vulnerable Refugee Minors

As documented in this report, most unaccompanied minors have little option but to remain in highly precarious situations in countries of first asylum. Others will go forth in search of sanctuary. Each year since 2010, the number of children arriving unaccompanied in the USA has doubled. It is estimated that 60,000 unaccompanied children will reach the USA in 2014. Though not on the same scale, other western states have also seen a significant increase in asylum applications from unaccompanied minors in recent years. 
 
Understanding why the international protection regime is failing to make effective use of one of the most important tools at its disposal – resettlement – is of critical importance. What are the obstacles? At what stage of the process do they occur? And what can be done to remove them? These and many other related questions provided the motivation for this research project. 

10,000 refugees from Iraq: A report on joint resettlement in the European Union

 

Violence has forced millions of Iraqi children, women and men to flee their homes and seek refuge both inside and beyond their country’s borders. In light of the challenges preventing refugees from returning to Iraq and of the obstacles to local integration in host countries like Jordan and Syria, for many of the most vulnerable refugees, resettlement in a new country is the only durable solution. With this report, the International Catholic Migration Commission (ICMC) and the International Rescue Committee (IRC) want to find out how far EU Member States have come to meet the pledge of resettling up to 10 000 refugees from Iraq, as expressed in the joint EU call of November 2008, and to document what can be considered as a first experience of joint  resettlement in the European Union.

After the Iraqi refugee crisis erupted in 2006, a coordinated EU response was slow to build up and initially relied on the generosity of eight countries with established resettlement programmes. These countries offered some 3 300 places for Iraqi refugees between 2007 and 2008. Under the leadership of Member States like France, Germany, the Netherlands and Sweden, and with the support of the European Commission, the EU response was energised by the November 2008 Council Conclusions and by the decision of a number of countries to establish ad hoc resettlement quotas. As a result, in 2009 alone, twelve EU countries were able to offer over 5 100 resettlement places, thereby bringing the number of resettled refugees from Iraq since 2007 to just over 8 400, and showing that EU countries are able to make a difference by acting together. At the same time, although the joint effort for Iraqi refugees clearly contributed to an increase in resettlement places available for refugees in the EU, with the global increase in resettlement between 2007 and 2009, the relative contribution of the EU has remained unchanged.

The report also describes how resettlement of Iraqis has been carried out in each of the countries involved and makes recommendations to guide further steps by both the EU, as it develops its first Joint EU Resettlement Programme, and the Member States. The November 2008 pledge to resettle up to 10 000 refugees from Iraq has not yet been met and it is not clear how and when this will happen. The question is how much more are the EU and its Member States prepared to do to address the continuing needs of Iraqi and other refugees in need of durable solutions.